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We currently have 30565 Nursing & Medical Jobs in the UK

The UK nursing and medical industry is one of the largest employers and most influential industries in the world. In particular, the NHS is the country’s largest nursing and medical employer, with over 1.5 million people, including more than 300,000 nurses covering more than 350 different nursing and medical jobs. In addition, there are currently over 5,000 life science companies in the UK, whilst the world’s top 20 pharmaceutical companies all have operations here.

With such a large variety of nursing and medical jobs available, what you will be expected to do daily will of course depend on the position you take. Working in nursing and medical covers everything from laboratory technician to nurse, as well as a range of settings, including care homes, hospitals, pharmaceutical laboratories and people’s homes. Whilst different in terms of tasks, many nursing and medical jobs will likely feature long hours and the possible need to work shifts and unsociable hours.

As you can imagine for such an important industry, qualifications are very important and required by many nursing and medical employers. For many nursing and medical jobs, including nursing, medicine and midwifery you will need a relevant degree as well as being registered with a professional body.

For some nursing and medical jobs, on-the-job training is provided, particularly for low-level entry positions such as those in pharmaceutical manufacturing. In addition to qualifications, certain personality traits are also highly desirable by nursing and medical employers, including empathy, staying calm and working well under pressure, attention to detail and good communication skills, particularly in face-to-face situations.

A career in the medical industry is generally very stable in terms of long-term job prospects and professional development. With the need for nurses and medical advances expected to grow, working in nursing and medical is especially recommended for those looking for a career with long-term stability. Most nursing and medical jobs in this industry have very distinct career paths, enabling you to clearly see what you will need to make the next step, including how long it will take and how much you can likely earn once you do.

There are many advantages to working in the nursing and medical industry. Perhaps one of the biggest professional benefits is job availability, with an almost constant skill shortage meaning you will always be able to find nursing and medical jobs once qualified.

In addition to good pay, regular opportunities for development and increasing demand for your skills by nursing and medical employers, you will also be playing an important role in society by helping people, often when they are in most need of it. Other advantages to working in nursing and medical include overtime opportunities, solid pay progression and increased freedom in terms of where and when you work.

The pressures involved in working in nursing and other medical-related positions means that disadvantages to a career in this sector do exist. Problems associated with nursing and medical jobs include feelings of being undervalued, long working hours and inadequate pay in relation to what many roles expect of you.

Other common complaints include difficult patients and having to deal with stressful, often life & death situations on an almost daily basis. The necessity to work shifts can also be a problem for some, particularly during national holidays when you will likely be expected to continue working as normal, whilst the large size of many nursing and medical employers means organisations can sometimes feel faceless and distant.